Recommended Fourth Way Reading

There are dozens of authors who have added to the body of Fourth Way literature since Gurdjieff first revealed his ideas to the world. Much of it is more of a distraction than a benefit to a student. These are the sources that we recommend and use in our school.

Books

G. I. Gurdjieff

Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson

More than simply a book, Beelzebub’s Tales to His Grandson is a tool for self-work. To make the best use of his writings, Gurdjieff himself offers the “friendly advice” to read each of his books three times.

“Firstlyat least as you have become mechanized to read all your contemporary books and newspapers.
Secondlyas if you were reading aloud to another person.
And only thirdlytry and fathom the gist of my writings.”

Meetings with Remarkable Men

Typically regarded as the most accessible of Gurdjieff’s books. Meetings with Remarkable Men is also the book most often encountered by people who aren’t members a Fourth Way School.

Life is Real Only Then, When ‘I Am”

The Herald of the Coming Good

Gurdjieff’s Early Talks 1914-1931

Paris Meetings 1943

P. D. Ouspensky

Ouspensky is one of Gurdjieff’s most well known (and possibly most notorious) students. Ouspensky broke with Gurdjieff and went his own way. His greatest contribution was as an excellent note taker.

In Search of the Miraculous

The Fourth Way

J. G. Bennett

Gurdjieff: Making a New World

Enneagram Studies

The Way to Be Free

Deeper Man

Kathleen Riordan Speeth

The Gurdjieff Work

Speeth’s The Gurdjieff Work presents an unusually useful survey of Gurdjieff’s core ideas.

Robert Earl Burton

Burton is an interesting character. If any numbers of the rumors surrounding him are true, then he is one more example of an imperfect vessel delivering important truths. We make no apologies or excuses for the man. That said, neither this school nor any of its members have ever had any dealings with Robert Earl Burton or his students.

Self-Remembering

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